DTU Studieprojekt - Electrical tuning of Single-Photon Source devices

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Electrical tuning of Single-Photon Source devices

Udbyder
Vejleder
Sted
København og omegn
This project is part of the wider challenge of the Quantum Light Sources group at DTU Electro. Our team, consisting of a heterogeneous group of 11-12 people between senior staff and Bachelor/Master/PhD students, is working every day on trying to establish the indispensable building blocks for future optical quantum technologies. Such technologies encompass quantum communications, quantum key distribution, and quantum computers, where the qubit (a two-level quantum-mechanical system) is used as the fundamental unit of information. Single-photon states have been demonstrated to be a very suitable and convenient physical implementation of qubits.
Project description

  • An ideal SPS is able to deterministically provide photons that are quantum-mechanically indistinguishable (i.e., identical to each other) and pure (i.e., each wave packet contains one and only one photon per time), with efficiency as close as possible to 100%. Over the last few years, self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) have shown great potential to be one of the most promising quantum emitters for SPS applications. However, the extraction efficiency and indistinguishability of a bare QD in a bulk material remain limited to a few percent due to total internal reflection at the semiconductor-air interface. One way to control and improve the efficiency and indistinguishability of QD emission is the incorporation of QDs within an engineered photonic environment, e.g., microcavities, waveguides, gratings, and micropillars. This results in the enhancement of its spontaneous decay rate.
In the perfect ideal case, the QD emission line and its relative cavity resonance have the same energy, however, as everything comes with a price, in real photonic nanostructures with embedded QDs, the two resonances are slightly detuned from each other. This is the reason why one of the biggest challenges in the state-of-the-art of such devices is exactly the implementation of an efficient external tuning mechanism, that would make it possible to spectrally align quantum emitter and cavity, and even different devices among themselves. Achieving this result will allow multi-qubit gates and algorithms and enable large-scale quantum computation. Under these circumstances, independent control of both QD and cavity frequencies becomes paramount.

There are some simple ways of tuning the QD emission line, such as changing the temperature or irradiating it with a laser, but this will only very slightly affect the cavity resonance, nonetheless. More sophisticated techniques include the application of external magnetic fields, strain, or electric contacts. The latter seems very promising in terms of integrity and scalability [2].

Within this project, the student can participate in the fabrication of metal contact on different types of cavities, this necessarily includes learning how to use some cleanroom facilities for metal deposition, maskless lithography, dry etching, and more. The second fundamental aspect is the characterization of the fabricated structures. This later-stage task is performed in our fully equipped optics laboratory, and it involves placing the chip in question in a cryostat, providing the access to the mentioned electrical contact, and finally assessing the performances of the electrical tuning provided.

While the exact nature of the project will depend upon the student’s interests, possible activities are:

· Development of an optimal design for metal contacts;

· Realization of the electrical contacts to nano-photonics cavities embedding QDs and optimization of deposition and etching recipes;

· Characterization of the main figures of merits of fabricated devices (efficiency, purity, indistinguishability);

· Assessment of the electrical tuning capabilities (tuning range and precision).

Basic knowledge of nano-optics is recommended. Prior experience at DTU NanoLab is not required but is advantageous.

Supervisors
Claudia Piccinini, clapi@dtu.dk, building 345A/067

Battulga Munkhbat, bamunk@dtu.dk, building 345A/075

Niels Gregersen, ngre@dtu.dk, building 345A/081

References

  • [1] N Gregersen, DPS McCutcheon, J. Mørk, Single-photon sources, in Handbook of Optoelectronic Device Modeling and Simulation, CRC Press (2017), [pages 585-608]

[2] Y T Lin, Y Z Ye, and W Fang, Electrically driven single-photon sources[J]. J. Semicond., 2019, 40(7), 071904. http://doi.org/10.1088/1674-4926/40/7/071904

Emneord

Tags
Kontakt
Virksomhed/organisation
DTU Fotonik

Navn
Claudia Piccinini

Stilling
Ph.d.-studerende

Mail
clapi@dtu.dk

Vejleder-info
Bachelor i Fysik og Ingeniørvidenskab
Vejleder
Claudia Piccinini

ECTS-point
5 - 35

Type
Afgangsprojekt, Bachelorprojekt, Fagprojekt, Kandidatspeciale, Specialkursus

Kandidatuddannelsen i Fysik og Teknologi
Vejleder
Claudia Piccinini

ECTS-point
5 - 35

Type
Afgangsprojekt, Bachelorprojekt, Fagprojekt, Kandidatspeciale, Specialkursus

Kandidatuddannelsen i Lys og Teknologi
Vejleder
Claudia Piccinini

ECTS-point
5 - 35

Type
Afgangsprojekt, Bachelorprojekt, Fagprojekt, Kandidatspeciale, Specialkursus

Skriv i din ansøgning, at du fandt jobbet på ofir.dk


DTU Studieprojekt - Electrical tuning of Single-Photon Source devices

Electrical tuning of Single-Photon Source devices

Udbyder
Vejleder
Sted
København og omegn
This project is part of the wider challenge of the Quantum Light Sources group at DTU Electro. Our team, consisting of a heterogeneous group of 11-12 people between senior staff and Bachelor/Master/PhD students, is working every day on trying to establish the indispensable building blocks for future optical quantum technologies. Such technologies encompass quantum communications, quantum key distribution, and quantum computers, where the qubit (a two-level quantum-mechanical system) is used as the fundamental unit of information. Single-photon states have been demonstrated to be a very suitable and convenient physical implementation of qubits.
Project description

  • An ideal SPS is able to deterministically provide photons that are quantum-mechanically indistinguishable (i.e., identical to each other) and pure (i.e., each wave packet contains one and only one photon per time), with efficiency as close as possible to 100%. Over the last few years, self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) have shown great potential to be one of the most promising quantum emitters for SPS applications. However, the extraction efficiency and indistinguishability of a bare QD in a bulk material remain limited to a few percent due to total internal reflection at the semiconductor-air interface. One way to control and improve the efficiency and indistinguishability of QD emission is the incorporation of QDs within an engineered photonic environment, e.g., microcavities, waveguides, gratings, and micropillars. This results in the enhancement of its spontaneous decay rate.
In the perfect ideal case, the QD emission line and its relative cavity resonance have the same energy, however, as everything comes with a price, in real photonic nanostructures with embedded QDs, the two resonances are slightly detuned from each other. This is the reason why one of the biggest challenges in the state-of-the-art of such devices is exactly the implementation of an efficient external tuning mechanism, that would make it possible to spectrally align quantum emitter and cavity, and even different devices among themselves. Achieving this result will allow multi-qubit gates and algorithms and enable large-scale quantum computation. Under these circumstances, independent control of both QD and cavity frequencies becomes paramount.

There are some simple ways of tuning the QD emission line, such as changing the temperature or irradiating it with a laser, but this will only very slightly affect the cavity resonance, nonetheless. More sophisticated techniques include the application of external magnetic fields, strain, or electric contacts. The latter seems very promising in terms of integrity and scalability [2].

Within this project, the student can participate in the fabrication of metal contact on different types of cavities, this necessarily includes learning how to use some cleanroom facilities for metal deposition, maskless lithography, dry etching, and more. The second fundamental aspect is the characterization of the fabricated structures. This later-stage task is performed in our fully equipped optics laboratory, and it involves placing the chip in question in a cryostat, providing the access to the mentioned electrical contact, and finally assessing the performances of the electrical tuning provided.

While the exact nature of the project will depend upon the student’s interests, possible activities are:

· Development of an optimal design for metal contacts;

· Realization of the electrical contacts to nano-photonics cavities embedding QDs and optimization of deposition and etching recipes;

· Characterization of the main figures of merits of fabricated devices (efficiency, purity, indistinguishability);

· Assessment of the electrical tuning capabilities (tuning range and precision).

Basic knowledge of nano-optics is recommended. Prior experience at DTU NanoLab is not required but is advantageous.

Supervisors
Claudia Piccinini, clapi@dtu.dk, building 345A/067

Battulga Munkhbat, bamunk@dtu.dk, building 345A/075

Niels Gregersen, ngre@dtu.dk, building 345A/081

References

  • [1] N Gregersen, DPS McCutcheon, J. Mørk, Single-photon sources, in Handbook of Optoelectronic Device Modeling and Simulation, CRC Press (2017), [pages 585-608]

[2] Y T Lin, Y Z Ye, and W Fang, Electrically driven single-photon sources[J]. J. Semicond., 2019, 40(7), 071904. http://doi.org/10.1088/1674-4926/40/7/071904

Emneord

Tags
Kontakt
Virksomhed/organisation
DTU Fotonik

Navn
Claudia Piccinini

Stilling
Ph.d.-studerende

Mail
clapi@dtu.dk

Vejleder-info
Bachelor i Fysik og Ingeniørvidenskab
Vejleder
Claudia Piccinini

ECTS-point
5 - 35

Type
Afgangsprojekt, Bachelorprojekt, Fagprojekt, Kandidatspeciale, Specialkursus

Kandidatuddannelsen i Fysik og Teknologi
Vejleder
Claudia Piccinini

ECTS-point
5 - 35

Type
Afgangsprojekt, Bachelorprojekt, Fagprojekt, Kandidatspeciale, Specialkursus

Kandidatuddannelsen i Lys og Teknologi
Vejleder
Claudia Piccinini

ECTS-point
5 - 35

Type
Afgangsprojekt, Bachelorprojekt, Fagprojekt, Kandidatspeciale, Specialkursus

Skriv i din ansøgning, at du fandt jobbet på ofir.dk


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